No Child Left Behind

The No Child Left Behind Act, signed in 2002 by President George W. Bush, was created to address the widening achievement gap among students from different socioeconomic backgrounds as well as provide accountability for academic results. The Act requires states to develop assessments in basic skills. To receive federal school funding, states must give these assessments to all students at select grade levels. The Act does not assert a national achievement standard, and individual states develop their own standards. Critics have argued that the Act has done little to increase student performance and address the issues it sought to fix. This section provides information on the No Child Left Behind Act, including the Act's provisions, criticisms, and consequences for failing to make adequate yearly progress goals, and more.

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